SCHEDULE

SCHEDULE

WEEK 1—Orienting

Wednesday, Aug. 29

  1. Introductions
  2. Syllabus
  3. The expectation in this class is to check your email each day during the week.

Assignment:

  1. Read : “Letters to Students” in Habits. Going forward, when you read from Habits for now on: Underlineat least two but no more than three short passages on each page that seem important or surprising to you, or about which you are curious, or which present a new idea about writing to you.Be prepared to discuss the passages you underlined with classmates. Single-tasking time-on-task: (20 min)
  2. Journal: In 30 minutes:

What is meeting half-way?

What is the philosophy of habits?

What is reflection?  How might assembly differ from the creation of a full-length written project?

How does this reading fit with your prior experience?  How do you feel about this approach?

  1. Look for email from UNEportfolios.
  2. Take no more than 5 minutes to skimthis reading(by skim I mean, quickly read two or three paragraphs, skip two or three, read a couple more, skip a couple more) and 5 more minutes to review this college-level writing assignment, then take 10 minutes to answer the questions in this anonymous survey about your high school reading and writing experiences.

Bring CHARGED computers to class next time, and always.

 

Friday, Aug. 31

  1. Journal playback
  2. ePortfolio

Log in

Create menu

Create Journal page.  Post Journal 1 AND post on our course site in the designated spot.  This is how you earn credit.

Create page: Artifact # 1 (for next week)

Begin to make it your own: resources here.

  1. Engagement card.

 

Assignment:

Artifact # 1: Write a narrative about your life as a HS student

What were your habits, mindset, dedication, approach?

Were you passed along?  Did you try hard?  Were you rewarded for easy work? Try to reflect as honestly as you can for this narrative.

Spend some time looking for and include a final draft of a writing project from high school* (last 2 years).  What are your thoughts about this project with a little remove?

Come with a draft of 300 words on Weds. 60-90 min

*entry essay?


WEEK 2—Beginning

Wednesday, Sept. 3—No Class

Assignment:

See above.

Wednesday, Sept. 5

  1. Freewrite—with HANDOUT
  2. Workshop; Workshopping 101 with HANDOUT
  3. Inventory of Revision—be prepared to hand in.
  4. Post on ARTIFACTS page: Draft 1 AND Revision Inventory, label. Could be a running list or a post with a link for easy organization.

Assignment:

  1. Revise for next time—work the draft up to 400-500 words. Post on ARTIFACTS page and print a copy of draft 1 and 2 to hand in. 45-60 min.

 LO_ Writing as a Recursive Process evaluation

Writing Process paper rubric for this.

  1. Read: “On Unlearning”—pp.16-18 in Habits.
  2. Journal (#2) on ways you’ve been altering/changing your approach to one of the following: What is unlearning in this context? How might you be unlearning one or more of the follow? How does that feel?

Curiosity

Attentiveness

Openness

Flexibility

Reflectiveness

Persistence

Post Journal 2 on your ePort AND post on our course site in the designated spot.  This is how you earn credit. 30 min.

 

Friday, Sept. 7

1.Freewrite

  1. Journal playback—quick share, collection of journal posts
  2. Listen to some of DFW’s “This is Water”: https://thinkythings.uneportfolio.org/this-is-water/

Notetaking exercise—get paper and be ready:  Consider:

What is his main idea?

What do you agree with?

Did it challenge some of your thinking, why?

(“Choosing what you pay attention to, choosing how you construct meaning from experience.”)

  1. Discussion to start in class:

What did you take notes on so far?   What attracted your attention?

 

Assignment:

  1. While still taking notes, finish listening to DFW’s “This is Water”: https://thinkythings.uneportfolio.org/this-is-water/

Perhaps you benefit from the transcript: here.

  1. Journal (#3): Take a look at your notes and distill some of your thoughts into something a little like 2 paragraphs-6-10 sentences each. Post on your ePort AND post on our course site in the designated spot. This is how you earn credit. (60 min.)
  2. Read and annotate: “On Confronting the Unknown” (p.21-23) in Habits. (15 min)
  3. Journal (#4): Practice Session ONE (p.24) on an unexpected event. Post on your ePort AND post on our course site in the designated spot. This is how you earn credit. (60 min.)

 


WEEK 3—Beginning (and Changing)

Monday, Sept. 10

1.Freewrite.

  1. Journal #3 playback: What’s important in this speech? A collection of paragraphs.
  2. If DFW were here today, what would you ask him about learning (or unlearning), certainty, reality, or any or curiosity that arose from his speech. 2 questions.  Be ready to share.
  3. Talk through writing as a Recursive Process L earning Outcome:

Experienced writers understand that writing is several different-but-related activities that rarely happen sequentially or just one time in each writing project. Writers

 

Assess the writing situation

Come up with ideas

Evaluate ideas

Develop ideas

Get words on the page

Organize words into paragraphs and paragraph-sequences

Assess their own writing

Seek and consider feedback

Rethink

Restructure

Rewrite

Add

Cut

Move

Clarify

Serve reader

  1. Return to Journal 4 and evaluate where you employed this moves in your process of completing the journal.
  2. On Confronting the Unknown” playback (if time)

Assignment:

  1. Read: “Joining the Conversation” pp. 26-30 Habits underlining passages that help you understand what an “endless conversation” is, why people have them, and what one looks like in pieces of writing. (15 min)
  2. Read and make marginal comments on p. 1-7 , para that ends with “…a lifetime of suffering.” (60 min). Identify 3-4 passages from the article that you are curious or interested or challenged by.  For each, on a separate paper, write 3-4 sentences each that articulate your interest in that passage.  This is annotation, btw. Print it out and bring it to class.

https://michaelpollan.com/articles-archive/an-animals-place/

 

Learning outcomes: Experienced writers read texts actively to understand them and critically to be in conversation with them by

  1. Annotating texts – making marks on a reading that:
    1. Segment a text into chunks
    2. Keep a running summary of the gist of the reading
    3. Track a writer’s argument by identifying claims, supporting and complicating evidence, and the underlying rationale
    4. Mark keywords and concepts and their examples
    5. Record reader reaction/responses
    6. Ask questions
    7. Make text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections
    8. Complicate or challenge facts, interpretations, assumptions or viewpoints
    9. Uncover and evaluate assumptions
    10. Consider implications

Wednesday, Sept. 12

  1. Freewrite.
  2. What is an endless conversations and why do people have them?
  3. What passages did you focus on as you read p. 1-7?  Possible groups to share and report.
  4. Let’s Write (15 minutes): Use some of the passages you underlined in “Joining the Conversation” to explain some of the ways Michael Pollan uses sources to stage (how and where does he set us up for people to speak) a spiraling conversation – one that is endless but nevertheless takes us somewhere – for his readers.
  5. Seeing signal phrases, voice markers, and pivotal words in Pollan’s article.

Assignment:

  1. Read and annotate Pollan, “An Animal’s Place” p. 7-13 (finish with”…but does it make any sense in nature?”) looking for places where he uses sources engaged in an “endless conversation.”

Identify 3-4 passages from the article that you are curious or interested or challenged by.  For each, on a separate paper, write 3-4 sentences each that articulate your interest in that passage.  This is annotation, btw. Print it out and bring it to class.

Recall from our Learning outcomes: Experienced writers read texts actively to understand them and critically to be in conversation with them by

  1. Annotating texts – making marks on a reading that:
    1. Segment a text into chunks
    2. Keep a running summary of the gist of the reading
    3. Track a writer’s argument by identifying claims, supporting and complicating evidence, and the underlying rationale
    4. Mark keywords and concepts and their examples
    5. Record reader reaction/responses
    6. Ask questions
    7. Make text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections
    8. Complicate or challenge facts, interpretations, assumptions or viewpoints
    9. Uncover and evaluate assumptions
    10. Consider implications                                                                                                                                                                                                                  (60 min)

Journal (# 5) :Look over the first two sections of the Pollan reading and identify:

1 passage you agree with

1 passage you disagree with

1 passage that you are conflicted about

For EACH passage, write 3-4 sentences about why you A/D/C with the ideas and how this passage might be useful in a CONVERSATION about animal rights/suffering/morality/the pleasures of eating.

(30-45 min)

 

Friday, Sept. 14

  1. Freewrite
  2. A return to endless conversations:
  • What’s at stake?
  • Who are the stakeholders?
  • Are there obvious or subtle biases in place?
  • What is the tenor of the conversation?
  • What’s the history of the conversation?
  1. Collection of passages: A/D/C
  2. What passages did you focus on as you read p. 7-13? Possible groups to share and report.
  3. Field Notes

 

As a reminder, bring Habits every class, even if we don’t use it.  I’ll be doing a book check on Monday.

Assignment:

  1. Finish reading and annotate Pollan, “An Animal’s Place” p. 13-19 (finish with”…but does it make any sense in nature?”) looking for places where he uses sources engaged in an “endless conversation.”

Identify 3-4 passages from the article that you are curious or interested or challenged by.  For each, on a separate paper, write 3-4 sentences each that articulate your interest in that passage.  This is annotation, btw. Print it out and bring it to class. (60 min)

  1. Journal (#6): Follow the Practice Session Reflecting on p. 30 (30 min)

If not, you are behind.  Get moving now.


WEEK 4—Joining the Conversation

Monday, Sept. 17

1.Freewrite

  1. Journal playback
  2. Groupwork:
  • Does Pollan think that animals can feel pain and/or suffer? Explain using evidence from the text.
  • Explain Pollan’s views on domestication of animals. Does he think of it as exploitation or enslavement? Why or why not? Explain in detail.
  • Have domesticated animals benefitted from their relationship with humans on Pollan’s view? Why or why not? Assess his position from your own perspective.

Assignment:

  1. Read: TS/IS The Art of Quoting, p. 42-51 and underline lines and passages that are interesting (30 min)
  2. Journal (# 7): Explain why the lines and passages you’ve underlined are interesting and/or important in TS/IS? (20 min)
  3. Experienced writers do these things…section 2 and 3 of the Pollan text. Find 2 examples for each section—be ready to share next class. (20 min)

Wednesday, Sept. 19

  1. Freewrite—book check.
  2. Journal playback—TS/IS
  3. Experienced writers do these things playback
  4. Let’s talk about a paper-like thing (PLT): Write a 600-750 word PLT in which you:

PLT: Introduce one aspect of the “endless conversation” about animals you noticed in the Pollan piece, in other words, the issue.

Describe and explain the positions in the conversation as you found them in Pollan—who are the stake holders, what is at stake, and what is the tenor of the conversation?  Work to do more than just list these portions.

Then put in your oar and tell me what you think of the existing positions in the conversation.  Are you in agreement totally with one member of the conversation, or conflicted by several?  You can agree, disagree, or have a complicated reaction.

Finish by explaining how your effort to understand Pollan’s consideration of Singer’s positions has moved your own thinking on the matter forward.  Has there been any change in your initial understanding of the conversation and why?  You might think of this as less of a reaction to the reading and the conversation, and more of a reflection on your thinking.

Try to use your sources in THREE of the SIX ways experienced writers use sources.

Possible Aspects of the Conversation to Write About:

      • What should be the criteria for determining whether it’s ethical to kill and eat animals?
      • Singer’s speciesist/racist analogy
      • The relative weight of human suffering and animal suffering
      • Whether human beings have a responsibility to treat animals well
      • Whether the happiness or welfare of animals matters
      • The implications of Pollan’s definition of “domestication”
      • Should we define what’s good for animals as what’s good for the individual animal versus what’s good for the species
      • How useful is philosophy in thinking about these questions? Are there limits to philosophy?
      • Singer’s response to Pollan’s email
      • Animal rights versus animal welfare
      • How effective Pollan’s “glass walls”/”looking” solution would be to improve animal welfare

Steal some of Pollan’s signal verbs and pivotal words and use them in your own writing as you introduce the views of other people

Quote from the Pollan piece 3 times.

PLT due on Monday, October 1.

Our focus for this project will largely be on how you are working with your sources.   

Assignment:

  1. Start by developing 200-300 words for next class. Create a PLT page and post as DRAFT 1. (60 min)

In-class writing lab next time.

 

Friday, Sept. 21

  1. In-class writing lab.
  2. Review your work and consider the following key points from The Art of Quoting (TS/IS):

–Did you “put yourself in their shoes”?

–Does your summary point to where you’re going?

–Do you use expressive signal verbs?

–Are your quotes relevant to your purpose?

–Did you “frame” your quotations?

–Did you blend the author’s words in with your own words?

 

Assignment:

  1. Read TS/IS The Art of Summary (p. 30-41) and underline lines and passages that are interesting (30 min)
  2. . Journal (# 8): Explain why the lines and passages you’ve underlined are interesting and/or important in TS/IS? (20 min)
  3. Continue drafting AND revising your paper as you go. Aim to improve your summaries and quotations. Add at least a new summaries or a new quotation which you use in at least ONE NEW way. Build toward 500 words.

Post as DRAFT 2 under PLT (60 min)


WEEK 5—What Brought You Here Won’t Always Carry You Forward

Monday, Sept. 24

  1. Freewrite
  2. TS/IS playback/collection of peer work
  3. Considering the rubric.

Assignment:

Continue drafting AND revising your paper as you go.  Focus on setting up your sources and strengthening your how clearly you are representing their ideas (summary, paraphrase, direct quotation—which is best?)  Aim 600-700 words that have also been revised.

Wednesday, Sept. 26

  1. Freewrite
  2. In-class journal (quiz):

1) Send me the link to your page on your ePort with 3 stages of your PLT draft (200 words, 500 words, 700 words)

2) In at least 250 words, respond to the in-class journal.

To start: Experienced writers understand that writing is several different-but-related activities that rarely happen sequentially or just one time in each writing project. Writers

  • Assess the writing situation
  • Come up with ideas
  • Evaluate ideas
  • Develop ideas
  • Organize words into paragraphs and paragraph-sequences
  • Assess their own writing
  • Rethink
  • Restructure
  • Rewrite
  • Add
  • Cut
  • Move
  • Clarify
  • Serve readers

Now, explain where and why you did 5 of these moves in your drafting sequence between D1, D2, and D3.  50 words for each explanation should do it.  Post during class time for credit, Journal # 9.

  1. Exchange drafts with your peer group; discussion of focus.

 

Assignment:

Read over you’re the drafts in your peer groups and respond in two ways—marginal comments and an end note.

A good comment will:

Be generous and considerate in tone;

Describe what you see or think as a reader, leading to a diagnosis of a problem or description of an improvement to be made;

Suggest a specific strategy for improvement;

Provide additional insight by: asking leading questions, providing further detail, suggesting specific materials for inclusion, or engaging in dialogue with the writer.

Indicate whether this is a high-, medium-, or low-priority issue.

Aim for no more than two comments per page, 20-30 words/comment

In an end comment, write some sentences that give the writer an idea of your overall impression or general effect of the paper. If you can, explain the central insight you have gotten from the paper as a careful reader.  Make suggestions about what improvements the writer should prioritize as s/he continues to develop his or her paper’s argument in global revision. (150-200 words)

Time on task, 45-60 min

 

Friday, Sept. 28

  1. Freewrite
  2. The Future of Seating!
  3. Peer review
  4. Inventory of revision
  5. Field Reports—there are now 10 weeks left.

As a way to help meet the goal of doing 5 Field Reports, one of these will be an oral report.  So then, we will all be reading an article from https://longform.org/ and present a response between 5-7 minutes between now and the end of the term.  We’ll try to do 1-2 of these on Fridays to break up the texture of the class.

To complete the assignment, you will need to:

  1. Summarize the article.
  2. Explain what you enjoyed about it
  3. Explain what you did not—readers don’t always need to enjoy what the read.
  4. Describe what parts of the article might have been difficult for the writer to write and why.
  5. Help us understand what this article made you think about, or brought some kind of new thinking to you.

Steps in this assignment.

  1. Sign up for presentation.
  2. Read an article—you may start reading one and decide you’d rather read another. That’s fine, be picky and find one you like. Just make sure it’s long enough to talk about it for 5 min.
  3. Prepare an outline of ideas—you’re not reading this
  4. Rehearse ahead of time. 5-7 minutes is your time on stage.
  5. Grading will be on (NY/OK/G/E) for all portions of the assignment.

 

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Assignment:

  1. Based off feedback from your peer, revise your paper to improve the ways you distinguish what they say from what you say. Post as FINAL DRAFT  under PLT. Bring a paper copy to class. (60-90 min)
  2. Read TS/IS/ Distinguishing What You Say from What They Say pp. 68-75 and underline lines and passages that are interesting (30 min)
  3. Journal (# 10): Explain why the lines and passages you’ve underlined are interesting and/or important in TS/IS? (20 min)

WEEK 6Paying Attention

Monday, October 1

  1. Freewrite
  2. Turn in paper
  3. Journal (# 10-in class!) Let’s reflect on your experience with this project so far—15 min.
  4. Conference discussion, in class:

Come to conference ready to discuss our progress on the following 3 Learning Outcomes:

Writing as a Recursive Process

Active Critical Reading

Working with Words of Others

 

You can synch up the work you’ve done to meet these outcomes:

Writing as a Recursive Process: draft of HS narrative; drafts of PLT; journals

Active Critical Reading:  Pollan, TS/IS; Habits; journals

Working with Words of Others: Drafts of PLTs; Field Notes; journals

Engagement as a Learner: Weekly “temp” cards

 

Prep for Conference: Right now, I’d Iike you to spend our remaining class time preparing to help me understand how you’ve performed in these 4 areas of the class.

For the things you’re doing well, explain what you’re doing well and why it’s working. For things you need to work on, try to figure out and explain the obstacles to your growth and what you need to overcome them

It would be helpful to start taking some notes and brainstorming.

We’ll spend much of next class working on this next class as it can work as a little “script” of sorts for our conference.

Assignment:

  1. Read TS/IS/ Distinguishing What You Say from What They Say pp. 68-75 and underline lines and passages that are interesting (30 min)
  2. Journal (# 11): Explain why the lines and passages you’ve underlined are interesting and/or important in TS/IS? (20 min)
  3. Spend 30 solid minutes continuing to prep for our conferences (see Prep for Conference above)

Wednesday, October 3

  1. Freewrite
  2. Journal # 11 playback
  3. Sign up/explain conferences
  4. Work on Prep for Conference & Preparing for our Conference (ePort)

 

Assignment:

  1. Spend 60 solid minutes prepping for our conferences (see Prep for Conference above). I’ll be assigning a Post-Conference report which will be available on _____Sunday, October 7____ here:

https://miller-eng122.uneportfolio.org/post-conference-report/

  1. Field Notes—it is almost too late to catch up. Work on these during this mixed week or so.

WEEK 7Are You Still Paying Attention?

Monday, October 8—conference

Assignment:

 

Wednesday, October 10—conference

 

Friday, October 12

  1. Freewrite
  2. Longform article presentations
  3. Artifact #2: Research 3 clubs or organization at UNE you are interested in and find out some details:

https://www.une.edu/studentlife/biddeford/activities-organizations/clubs-and-organizations

  1. Start with the What, Where, When of the club.

What is its mission?

Who is the contact?

What makes this club interesting to you?

 

It’s possible that not all of these clubs are currently operating and/or you may not get a response.  So, the key here is to reach out to 3 separate clubs in order to hit

 

  1. Send out 3 emails to the contact and CC me in the email.

Explain: Why you are writing.

Ask: What does it take to be involved? How long has it been around?

Ask: A question of your own.

 

  1. Once you have a response, synthesize your information in to a report, post it as ARTIFACT # 2

Your synthesis should include the big components of the project:

REPORT PORTION (200ish WORDS):

  • What, Where, When of the club.
  • What is its mission?
  • Who is the contact?
  • What makes this club interesting to you?
  • What does it take to be involved?
  • How long has it been around?
  • A question of your own.

ANALYTICAL PORTION (200 WORDS):

  • How would participation in this group enrich your college experience? And how might it be a benefit to your life after UNE

DUE, MONDAY, OCT 22

Assignment:

Check out this page compiling Terry Gross interviews:

http://www.vulture.com/2017/05/fresh-air-terry-gross-best-interviews-npr.html

JOURNAL # 12: Pick one and discuss what makes her so successful at gathering surprising or compelling POV etc, follow the same format on PS1 p. 67

DUE, MONDAY, OCT 15


WEEK 8—It’s Later Than You Think

Monday, October 15

  1. Freewrite—write and report on your status of Artifact # 1
  2. Journal playback: A collection of responses
  3. What is the purpose of an interview?

What is the role of the interviewer—what are they trying to do?

And what is the role of the interviewee—what are they trying to do?

What kinds of interviews are there?

What makes an interview good?  And bad?

Who would you like to interview in the UNE community?  What would you ask that person?

  1. Charles Barkley—do athletes have a moral responsibility to behave? (if time)

 

Assignment:

  1. Read “On Interviewing” p. 64-67. Journal #13: What’s interesting/curious/helpful about these 3 pages. 200 words, can be bullet points.
  2. Continue working on Artifact #2

Wednesday, October 17

  1. Freewrite
  2. Journal # 12 playback
  3. Artifact # 2 check in: Anyone heard anything back? The full Artifact 2 project is due on Monday.
  4. Let’s take a look at this archive from the LOC: Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1938

Let’s start here:

But move to look at the full connection: here.

Now, explore the archive in groups of two or three.  Establish a group leader who will present.

  • What curiosities does your group have about this collection?
  • What kind of challenges might the interviewers have faced compiling these narratives? And the interviewees?
  • What questions would you ask these interviewers?
  • Find 2 passages from these narratives and be ready help me understand why the are significant/important to your group.
  • What is the purpose of interviewing former slaves?
  • What should someone who doesn’t know about this project know about this project?

 

Assignment:

  1. Read this interview with Terry Gross: here.

Journal # 14:

50 words: What do you like about this article?

50: What did you learn about Terry Gross?

50 words: What questions would you ask Terry Gross? (2)

  1. Continuing working on Artifact # 2

 

Friday, October 19

  1. Freeewrite
  2. Presentations
  3. Journal playback # 14
  4. Create an Artifact # 2 page on your ePortfolio and post your Artifact # 2 assignment by Monday’s class.

 

5. Artifact # 3, We’re Building an Archive: Interview 3 people at UNE asking them the following questions:

 

Make sure they haven’t been interviewed by someone in this class—ask them!  Use their first name only when compiling your response.  Get them to respond with at least 3 sentences for each question.

  • Why did you decide to come to UNE?
  • What do you think about UNE now?
  • Unspecified follow up (this is where you improvise a bit)
  • Would you recommend attending UNE to perspective students?
  • Are you involved in any extracurricular activities?
  • What is your biggest priority this semester and why?

Create an Artifact # 3 page and transcribe the interview.

Post on your ePortfolio and send me the link by _____Monday, October 29______ before class.

Some ground rules:

Treat this seriously.  We’re trying to build an archive of 30 + responses to use in our second project.  The less serious you are, the lower the quality of the ultimate project.

Don’t interview someone on your team, your club, or someone who lives in your dorm—think about how interviewers might impact an interviewee’s response.

In-person interviews only.

Consider using your phone to record the interview so you don’t have to hand-write the responses.

Be polite and ask if they mind you recoding the conversation.

Have fun.

 

Assignment:

  1. Finish Artifact # 2.
  2. Begin Artifact # 3

WEEK 9—What’s the Real Story?

Monday, October 22

  1. Freewrite.
  2. How is Artifact # 3 going?
  3. Watch Carol Dweck’s TED Talk “The Power of Believing That You Can Improve” with transcript. Take notes on her talk—what are the big points?

Form groups and discuss the notes you took on Dweck.

Assign a scribe:

What’s concepts are in play here?

What stands out to you as important?

What questions do you have/what ideas are challenging?

  1. Journal # 15, pt 1: Summarize our discussion in class today, 150 words (if time)

 

Assignment:

Journal # 15, pt. 2: Consider the assignments we’ve worked on so far this term, specifically:

Artifact # 1 (HS experiences)

Field Notes

Post Conference Report

Journal Reflections

Make 2 connections between the Dweck’s Ted Talk and your experiences this semester.  Help me see where specifically you’ve noticed a growth- or fixed mindset so far.

  • For each connection, start with a claim to shape the paragraph you’re developing. (1-2 sentences)
  • Then signal what it is you’re bringing into the discussion from Dweck and quote. (2-4 sentences)
  • Then work to explain how the quote fits with the claim you’ve made (1-2 sentences)
  • Then signal what it is you’re bringing into the discussion from an assignment above and quote. (2-4 sentences)
  • Then help explain how these 2 quoted portions fit together support the claim you’ve made. (2-4 sentences)
  • Time on task, 60 min (roughly 30+ min for each one)

Wednesday, October 24

  1. Freewrite
  2. Journal # 15 playback
  3. Atul Gawande: What to Get Great at Something? Get a Coach:

Take notes on his talk—what are the big points?

 

https://www.ted.com/talks/atul_gawande_want_to_get_great_at_something_get_a_coach?language=en#t-987920

  1. In groups:

What’s concepts are in play here?

What stands out to you as important?

What questions do you have/what ideas are challenging?

 

Assignment:

  1. Journal # 16: You’ve all had a coach in Eric Drown (as well as me) this semester who, as Gawande suggests about good coaching, offers “external eyes and ears, providing a more accurate picture of your reality.” For this journal, identify 3 specific moments during the semester where you and your coach worked together to help you, as Gawande puts it, at “a whole other level of awareness.  What was it, how did it work?  100 words per moment.
  2. Continue to work on Artifact # 3

 

Friday, October 26

  1. Freewrite
  2. Presentations
  3. Journal # 16 playback
  4. Start to Watch Amy Cuddy’s TED Talk

Take notes on her talk—what are the big points?

Assignment:

  1. Finish watching the Amy Cuddy Ted Talk.

Journal # 17: Amy Cuddy focuses her Ted Talk on ways to become something you are currently not by pretending.   For this journal, identify 2 concrete moments from the semester where you felt to be pretending to fit in or where you faked knowing what to do in order to succeed.  What were the challenges in these moments?  What was at stake?  How have these moments brought you to where you are now?

  1. Journal # 17: Read the transcript for the Amy Cuddy Ted Talk and come up with 3 “meaty” questions that arise after reading.  Each question should strive provoke a response that is more than just yes or no, so these could be multiple sentence questions, potentially with statements that help establish background or context.  Develop each question and aim of 30-40 words per question.

2. Continue to work on Artifact # 3–be sure to post BEFORE class tomorrow.


WEEK 10—Faking it Until…

Monday, October 29

  1. Freewrite
  2. Journal playback: a collection of questions
  3. Watch Amy Cuddy’s TED Talk

Take notes on her talk—what are the big points?

Assignment:

Journal # 18: Amy Cuddy focuses her Ted Talk on ways to become something you are currently not by pretending.   For this journal, identify 2 concrete moments from the semester where you felt to be pretending to fit in or where you faked knowing what to do in order to succeed.  What were the

Wednesday, October 31

  1. Freewrite
  2. Journal playback—faking it.
  3. Investigate the archive in groups of 3: divide, conquer, report.
  • Do anything in these responses surprise you?
  • Are there patterns you notice in the collection?
  • How would you describe this sampling of UNE students?
  • How does that fit with your (individual) reality as you experience your first semester—be specific.
  • What other curiosities emerge after looking at the archive?

Assignment:

  1. Journal # 19: Consider how you would respond to being asked these same questions. What challenges might emerge responding accurately and honestly? (100 words)

Consider someone in your life who helped you prepare for college.  Who is that person?  How did they help you prepare?  (100 words)

  1. Continue working on your Field Notes

Friday, November 2

  1. Freewrite
  2. Presentations
  3. Unpack PLT # 2/score sheet

Assignment:

  1. Create a PLT # 2 page.

 

*****To earn credit:

Send me the link to this page BEFORE class on _____Monday, November 5____.

 

  1. Consider the 3 Ted Talks we examined and discussed:

Carol Dweck: The Power of Believing You Can Improve

Atul Gawande: Want to Get Great at Something?  Get a Coach

Amy Cuddy: Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are

Describe each of these texts focusing on key concepts in a 3-4 sentences.  If you are unable to do so readily, you’ll likely need to revisit these works.

*****To earn credit:

Print out a copy of this part of the project and turn it in on ____Monday, November 5____.

 

  1. Consider the range of experiences and work captured in your Artifacts, Journals, and your Mid-semester report and decide which text above most aligns accurately with your experience as a college student this semester. This text will be your anchor text for the project.

Then, once you select your anchor text, summarize this text in 400-500 words.   Work to help report on who your source is exactly, their background, the keys concepts in the text, and specific examples that flesh out your summary reporting.

  • Use signal phrases to move away from your reporting to allow your source to speak. Refer to back to TS/IS.
  • Be sure to quote from the anchor text at least 2 times for this portion with more than just a snippet quote.

*****To earn credit:

Summary Draft 1 of no less than 300 words will be posted as JOURNAL 20 BEFORE class on ______11/5_____.


WEEK 11—Putting it All Together

Monday, November 5

  1. Freewrite. 2. Exchange drafts and offer 3 comments for each paper.  Use the guidelines for good peer review below to help to improve the thinking and writing of classmates.  In your comments be sure to:
  • Be generous and considerate in tone;
  • Describe what you see or think as a reader, leading to a diagnosis of a problem or description of an improvement to be made;
  • Suggest a specific strategy for improvement;
  • Provide additional insight by: asking leading questions, providing further detail, suggesting specific materials for inclusion, or engaging in dialogue with the writer.

Peer Review Journal: Make note of the most helpful comment you offered and received and record it as a journal BEFORE class ends on ______11/5_____.

 

Once finished, begin revision of Summary Draft 1.

Assignment:

Print a copy of Summary Draft 3 for evaluation and bring to class on 11/9; post Summary Draft 3 on your PLT # 2 page BEFORE class on ___11/9___ and send me the link.

 

Wednesday, November 7

  1. Freewrite. 2. Unpack PLT # 2, PT 2.  3 In-class writing time.

Assignment:

Print a copy of Summary Draft 3 for evaluation and bring to class on 11/9; post Summary Draft 3 on your PLT # 2 page BEFORE class on ___11/9___ and send me the link.

+

See assignment (below) for next week.

 

Friday, November 9

  1. Freewrite. 2. Presentations.  3.  Revision/drafting strategy planning of PLT # 2(in-class writing). 4. Sign up for conferences.

Assignment:

  1. Post a draft on your Intro as a journal BEFORE class time, even though we don’t have class by ___11/12___.
  2. Come to conference with 3-4 Body paragraphs posted—have it ready to go on your laptop.

MAKE SURE TO FOLLOW THE PLT 2 HANDOUT TO EARN FULL CREDIT.  WORK IS DUE EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT IN CLASS.

KEY DATES:

Monday, 11/12-Thursday 11/15—Conferences.

Monday, Nov. 19—In-class writing, exchange drafts end of class.

Monday, Nov. 26—Peer review PLT 2, PT 2.

Friday, Nov. 30—Final version due, printed.